Barbados

The land of the flying fish and sandy white beaches and the home of rum. A Bajan holiday involves rum cocktails, relaxation, leisure and snorkelling with turtles. Barbados is the birthplace of Rihanna. Chattels are small moveable wooden houses which are closely tied to the island's heritage. In olden days when these houses were purchased they could be moved from one property to another hence they were constructed on blocks which made them easier to move. The best mode of transport is via the local reggae buses!

🙂 Rum. Reggae. Tropical beaches. Oistin’s Fish Fry on a Friday night. Rainforests and Gardens. Bathsheba Beach. Speightstown.

🙁 Swimming with turtles (and feeding them – too many people – should be regulated). People offering drugs. Do not wear camouflage clothing – it is illegal!

Currency: Bajan Dollar

THREE things we did not know about Barbados:

  1. Garrison Savannah has a British air about it, and rightly so – it has been rooted firmly in the Barbadian landscape since the colonial era, 1845 to be precise. History suggests that troops were once stationed in the area where Garrison Savannah can be found in Bridgetown, hence the name. In late February and early March, Garrison Savannah plays host to the Barbados Gold Cup, a thoroughbred horse race which has been on the events calendar since 1982. 
  2. As Barbadian legend would have it, grapefruit was discovered in Welchman Hall Gully in the 18th century. Its existence is said to have something to do with a cross-pollination that occurred naturally, between Shaddock and Sweet Orange.
  3. Barbados which was colonised by the British played a large role in the African Slave industry: In 1846, there were nearly 500 active sugar plantations, functioning through imported manpower.

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