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Jordan: Dead Sea

The Dead Sea, also known by other names, is a salt lake bordered by Jordan to the east and the West Bank and Israel to the west. It lies in the Jordan Rift Valley, and its main tributary is the Jordan River and is 430m below sea level.

Jordan: Wadi Rum

Wadi Rum Desert is famed for its link to T.E. Lawrence the original “Lawrence of Arabia”. Along with Prince Feisal bin Al-Hussein, he made his base here during the Arab Revolt of 1917-1918. At the center of Wadi Rum village is the Desert Police fort.

Jordan: Petra

Petra is a famous archaeological site in Jordan’s southwestern desert. Dating to around 300 B.C., it was the capital of the Nabatean Kingdom. Accessed via a narrow canyon called Al Siq, it contains tombs and temples carved into pink sandstone cliffs, earning its nickname, the “Rose City.” Perhaps its most famous structure is 45m-high Al Khazneh, a temple with an ornate, Greek-style facade, and known as The Treasury.

Jordan: Madaba & Mount Nebo

Madaba is an ancient town in Jordan, southwest of the capital Amman. It’s known for its 6th-century mosaic map of the Holy Land in the Greek Orthodox Church of St. George. The Madaba Archaeological Park preserves the mosaic-rich Church of the Virgin Mary and artifacts from the Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine and Islamic eras. Northwest, the biblical hill of Mount Nebo overlooks the Jordan Valley and the Dead Sea.

Jordan

Jordan is officially called the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan and is situated in Western Asia at the crossroads of Asia, Africa and Europe. It is home to more than 100,000 archaeological, religious and tourist sights including Petra, Dead Sea, Wadi Rum to name a few. Jordan is rich in history and culture, it is a great holiday destination to enjoy your time and educate yourself on Middle Eastern heritage.

Jordan: Amman

Amman, the capital of Jordan, is a modern city with numerous ancient ruins. Atop Jabal al-Qala’a hill, the historic Citadel includes the pillars of the Roman Temple of Hercules and the 8th-century Umayyad Palace complex, known for its grand dome. Built into a different downtown hillside, the Roman Theatre is a 6,000-capacity, 2nd-century stone amphitheater offering occasional events.

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